A Quick History of Vogue Magazine

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1892 – First Vogue Magazine Cover

Early years
“In 1892,[2] Arthur Turnure founded Vogue as a weekly publication in the United States, sponsored by Kristoffer Wright;[3] the first issue was published on December 17 of that year, with a cover price of 10 cents (equivalent to $2.62 in 2015).[4] Turnure’s intention was to create a publication that celebrated the “ceremonial side of life”; one that “attracts the sage as well as debutante, men of affairs as well as the belle.”[4] From its inception, the magazine targeted the new New York aristocracy, establishing social norms in a country that did not value class and ceremony as much as England or France. The magazine at this time was primarily concerned with fashion, with coverage of sports and social affairs included for its male readership.[4] Wikipedia

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1893 – Halloween Cover

1893October

1893 October

1893November

1893 November

1902 1902

1904February1904 February

1905Winter

1905 – Winter

Condé Nast – 1905
“Condé Montrose Nast bought Vogue in 1905 one year before Turnure’s death and gradually grew the publication. He changed it to a bi-weekly magazine and also started Vogue overseas in the 1910s. After first visiting Britain in 1916, he started Vogue there, followed by Vogue in Spain, and then Italy in Italy and France in 1920, where the magazine was well received. The magazine’s number of publications and profit increased dramatically under Nast’s management. By 1911, the Vogue brand had garnered a reputation that it continues to maintain, targeting an elite audience and expanding into the coverage of weddings.” Wikipedia

1907Feb1907 February

1909vogue

1909 March

1909December1909 December

1910March 1910 March

1910April

1910 April

1910August1910 August

1913March 1913 March

1913November1913 November

1914feb21914 February

1914May2 1914 May

1914June1914 June

1914July1914 July

1917Vogue,_portada_de_mayo_de_1917 1917 May

1921June 1921 June

1922March 1922 March

1927April 1927 April

1928Jan 1928 January

1928March 1928 March

The magazine’s number of subscriptions surged during the Great Depression, and again during World War II. During this time, noted critic and former Vanity Fair editorFrank Crowninshield served as its editor, having been moved over from Vanity Fair by publisher Condé Nast.[5]

1941July 1941 July

1947Wubter 1947 Winter

1950January 1950 January

1950March 1950 March

1950april

1950 April

1950June

1950 May

1950August 1950 August

1950September

1950 September

1950November1950 November

1951Feb

1951 February

1952September 1952 September

1958April 1958 April

Laird Borrelli notes that Vogue led the decline of fashion illustration in the late 1930s, when they began to replace their celebrated illustrated covers, by artists such asDagmar Freuchen, with photographic images.[6]

1961September

1961 September

1964June 1964 June

1964Nov 1964 November

1965 1965

1966March 1966 March

1968October 1968 October

1969June 1969 June

In the 1960s, with Diana Vreeland as editor-in-chief and personality, the magazine began to appeal to the youth of the sexual revolution by focusing more on contemporary fashion and editorial features that openly discussed sexuality. Toward this end, Vogue extended coverage to include East Village boutiques such as Limbo on St. Mark’s Place, as well as including features of “downtown” personalities such as Andy Warhol, “Superstar” Jane Holzer‘s favorite haunts.[7] Vogue also continued making household names out of models, a practice that continued with Suzy Parker, Twiggy, Jean Shrimpton, Lauren Hutton, Veruschka, Marisa Berenson, Penelope Tree, and others.[8]

In 1973, Vogue became a monthly publication.[9] Under editor-in-chief Grace Mirabella, the magazine underwent extensive editorial and stylistic changes to respond to changes in the lifestyles of its target audience.[10] Wikipedia

Anna Wintour takes over 1988

July 1988

Anna Wintour became editor-in-chief of American Vogue in July 1988.[11] Noted for her trademark bob cut and sunglasses, Wintour sought to revitalize the brand by making it younger and more approachable;[12]she directed the focus towards new and accessible concepts of “fashion” for a wider audience.[13] Wintour’s influence allowed the magazine to maintain its high circulation, while staff discovered new trends that a broader audience could conceivably afford.[13] For example, the inaugural cover of the magazine under Wintour’s editorship featured a three-quarter-length photograph of Michaela Bercu, an Israeli super model, wearing a bejeweled Christian Lacroix jacket and a pair of jeans, a departure from her predecessors’ tendency to portray a woman’s face alone; according to the Times, this gave “greater importance to both her clothing and her body”.[14] As fashion editor, Grace Coddington wrote in her memoirs, the cover “endorsed a democratic new high/low attitude to dressing, added some youthful but sophisticated raciness, and garnished it with a dash of confident energy and drive that implied getting somewhere fast. It was quintessential Anna.”[12] Wintour continues to be American Vogue ‘ s editor-in-chief to this day.

The contrast of Wintour’s vision with that of her predecessors was noted as striking by observers, both critics and defenders. Amanda Fortini, fashion and style contributor for Slate, argues that her policy has been beneficial for Vogue:[15]

When Wintour was appointed head of Vogue, Grace Mirabella had been editor in chief for 17 years, and the magazine had grown complacent, coasting along in what one journalist derisively called “its beige years”. Beige was the color Mirabella had used to paint over the red walls in Diana Vreeland’s office, and the metaphor was apt: The magazine had become boring. Among Condé Nast executives, there was worry that the grand dame of fashion publications was losing ground to upstart Elle, which in just three years had reached a paid circulation of 851,000 to Vogue ‘s stagnant 1.2 million. And so Condé Nast publisher Si Newhouse brought in the 38-year-old Wintour, who through editor-in-chief positions at British Vogue and House & Garden, had become known not only for her cutting-edge visual sense, but also for her ability to radically revamp a magazine to shake things up.” Wikipedia

1988JulyVogue-Editorial-July-1988-Katoucha-Niane-by-I-007163

1988 July Editorial

1988JulyVogue-Editorial-July-1988-Katoucha-Niane-by-I-012811

1988JulyVogue-Editorial-July-1988-Katoucha-Niane-by-I-035207

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Documentaries[edit]

Main article: The September Issue

In 2009, the feature-length documentary The September Issue was released; it was an inside view of the production of the record-breaking September 2007 issue of U.S. Vogue, directed by R. J. Cutler. The film was shot over eight months as Wintour prepared the issue, and included testy exchanges between Wintour and her creative director Grace Coddington. The issue became the largest ever published at the time; over 5 pounds in weight and 840 pages in length, a world record for a monthly magazine [41] Since then, that record has been broken by Vogue’s 2012 September issue, which came in at 916 pages.[42]

in-vogue-the-editors-eye-movie-poster__oPt

Also in 2012, HBO released a documentary entitled In Vogue: The Editor’s Eye, in conjunction with the 120th anniversary of the magazine. Drawing on Vogue ‘ s extensive archives, the film featured behind-the-scenes interviews with long time Vogue editors, including Wintour, Coddington, Tonne Goodman, Hamish Bowles and Phyllis Posnick. Celebrated subjects and designers in the fashion industry, such as Nicole Kidman, Sarah Jessica Parker, Vera Wang, and Marc Jacobs, also appear in the film. The editors share personal stories about collaborating with top photographers, such as Leibowitz, and the various day-to-day responsibilities and interactions of a fashion editor at Vogue. The film was directed and produced by Fenton Bailey and Randy Barbato. In October 2012, Vogue also released a book titled Vogue: The Editor’s Eyeto complement the documentary.[43]

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Criticism – The Devil Wears Prada

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As Wintour came to personify the magazine’s image, both she and Vogue drew critics. Wintour’s one-time assistant at the magazine, Lauren Weisberger, wrote a roman à clef entitled The Devil Wears Prada. Published in 2003, the novel became a bestseller and was adapted as a highly successful, Academy Award-nominated film in 2006. The central character resembled Weisberger, and her boss was a powerful editor-in-chief of a fictionalized version of Vogue. The novel portrays a magazine ruled by “the Antichrist and her coterie of fashionistas, who exist on cigarettes, Diet Dr Pepper, and mixed green salads”, according to a review in The New York Times. The editor is described by Weisberger as being “an empty, shallow, bitter woman who has tons and tons of gorgeous clothes and not much else”.[31] The success of both the novel and the film brought new attention from a wide global audience to the power and glamour of the magazine, and the industry it continues to lead.[32] Wikipedia

Video channel

In 2013, Vogue launched the Vogue video channel that can be accessed via their website. The channel was launched in conjunction with Conde Nast’s multi-platform media initiative. Mini-series that have aired on the video channel include Vogue Weddings, The Monday Makeover, From the Vogue Closet, Fashion Week, Elettra‘s Goodness, Jeanius, Vintage Bowles, The Backstory, Beauty Mark, Met Gala, Voguepedia,Vogue Voices, Vogue Diaries, CFDA/Vogue Fashion Fund, and Monday’s with Andre.[44] Wikipedia

http://video.vogue.com/

Guido Palau on Hair Treatments for the Met

Accessories

Accent Earrings

Statement Jewelry

Voguepedia

Launched in 2011 by Condé Nast Digital, Voguepedia is a fashion encyclopedia that also includes an archive of every issue of Vogue ‘ s American edition since 1892.[46] Only Vogue staff are permitted to contribute to the encyclopedia, unlike the VogueEncyclo—hosted by Vogue Italia—that receives contributions from anyone.[47] As of 9 May 2013, the site is not fully functional, as code still shows in search results and only certain search terms yield results.[48] Wikipedia

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About jackikellum

Jacki Kellum is a Fine Artist, a Designer, and also a writer. For one of her graduate programs, she wrote her thesis on William Blake. Like Blake, much of Kellum's work is about childhood and lost innocence. Also like Blake, Kellum strives to both write and illustrate her work. .
This entry was posted in Anna Wintour, Devil Wears Prada, Metropolitan Museum Costume Institute, September Issue, Vogue Magazine and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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