A Chronology of Vogue Covers and Images

1892Decemberadj 1892 December 17 – The First Issue of Vogue 1892Sept2adj 1892 – September 2 1893jan14 1893 January 14 1893jan21 1893 January 25 1893feb4 1893 February 11 1893feb11 1893 February 11 1893Feb25 1893 February 25 1893mar25 1893 March 25 1893Halloween 1893 Halloween 1893Nov161893 November 16 1895April18 1895 April 18 1895oct1895 October 1896June 1896 June 1896sept 1896 September 1897Sept 1897 September 1897Dec 1897 December Vogue Cover - July 1899 Premium Giclee Print1899 July 1910April1 1910 April 1 Vogue Cover - July 1910 Premium Giclee Print1910 July 1913july 1913 July Vogue Cover - November 1913 Premium Giclee Print1913 November 1914March 1914 March 15 1914pril 1914 April 1 1915March1 1915 March 1 1915June 1915 June 15 1915July11915 July 1 1916Aug1 1916 August 1 1918April1 1918 April 1 1919Janlate 1919 Late January 1919March15adj 1919 March 15 1919July1 1919 July 1 Vogue Cover - April 1920 Stretched Canvas Print 1920 April1920sept15adj 1920 September 15 1921an 1921 January 15 1921Feb1 1921 February 1 1921Feb1detail 1921 Detail Vogue Cover - March 1921 Premium Giclee Print1921 March 1921MayLate 1921 Late May 1921OctoberLate 1921 Late October Vogue Cover - January 1922 Premium Giclee Print1922 June 1922October1922 October

vogue 1923

1923 September

1924june-19241924 June

1926Jan

1926 January

???????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????????? 1926 July 15 1926Sep1 1926 September 1 1927jan11927 January 1 1927Feb 1927 February 15 1927Mar15 1927 March 15 1927April1 1927 April 1 1927April151927 April 15 1927May 1927 May 15 1927June

1927 June Late

1929Feb2  1929 February 2

1929June8 1929 June 8 1929Sept14 1929 September 14 1930April26 1930 April 26 1930March1930 March 1930June71930 June 7 1930July5 1930 July 5 1930Oct13 1930 October 13 1930Nov 1930 November 10

1932 January 1 1932October 1932 October Vogue Cover - April 1933 Premium Giclee Print1933 April 1933July1933 July 1939June15 1939 June 15

vogue september 1933

1933 September

1935 June

January 1937

1937 January

January 1937

April 1937

1937 April

April 1937

June 1937

1937 June 23

June 1937

June 1937

July 1937

1937 July

July 1937

August 1937 1937 August

August 1937

September 1937

1937 September

September 1937

March 1938

1938 March – Editor Elizabeth Penrose

April 1938

1938 April- Editor Elizabeth Penrose

June 1938

1938 June – Editor Elizabeth Penrose

August 1938

1938 August – Editor Elizabeth Penrose

November 1938

1938 – November – Editor Elizabeth Penrose

December 1938

1938 December – Editor Elizabeth Penrose

  1939 July 1

March 1939

1939 – March – Editor Elizabeth Penrose

April 1939

1939 April – Editor Elizabeth Penrose

May 1939

1939 May

May 1939

June 1939

1939 June – Editor Penrose

November 1939

1939 November

January 1940

January 1940

April 1940

1940 April – Editor Audrey Withers

1940June1Cover 1940 June 1

December 1940

December 1940

1941May151941 May 15

June 1941

1941 June

July 1941

1941 July

1941July1adj 1941 July 1 1941July15 1941 July 15 1941Oct11941 October 1 1941Dec1 1941 December 1

February 1942

1942 February

August 1943

1942 August

1942Augadj

August 1942

1945May

vogue september 1943

1943 September

September 1943

1943 September

September 1943

January 1944

1944 January

April 1944

April 1944 [Lee Miller was the Vogue War Correspondent during World War II]

October 1944

October 1944

“The issue features Vogue’s first still life cover and boasts a subscription rate of £2 for 12 numbers.”In this issue we show you our first contacts with our French office and its friends whose ordeal has been different from ours, but not less. How many of our French staff were lost in 1940 we do not yet know. The 20-year-old son of our Paris editor was shot, this June, by the Gestapo. The husband of another colleague is held to ransom in Germany. The daughter of a third, after years in concentration camps, is in prison in Silesia. The French concept of civilised life has been maintained, but at a heavy price.”

http://www.vogue.co.uk/magazine/archive/issue/1944/October

November 1944

November 1944

“Lee Miller, Vogue’s correspondent in France, went down to the Loire, saw two sensational German surrenders, took these pictures of bridges outside Orleans and at Beaugency – blown up by the Germans in 1940 – and writes eye-witness descriptions on page 82.

“Meanwhile Lesley Blanch writes about the forthcoming peace: “Already the signs and portents of victory sparkle in a thousand ways, both great and small. Book-lovers rejoice that the paper rationing is increased. Sweet-tooth tots anticipate extra Christmas lollipops. Careworn housewives are lured in by the bait of uncouponed bath towels.”

February 1945

1945 February – Editor Audrey Withers

March 1945

1945 March – Editor Audrey Withers

July 1945

1945 July – Editor Audrey Withers

August 1945

1945 August

September 1945

September 1945

“The point made by Vogue with these two women on the cover – one sleekly understated, the other more obvious – is that the austerity of war will last into peacetime. Now is no time for ostentatious displays.”

October 1945

1945 October

“With the war in Europe and the Far East finally having come to an end in September, Vogue has no suitable cover commissioned for this issue. James de Holden-Stone, the magazine’s art director, makes his point aptly with a painting of blue skies – denoting the end of the blitz over London.”

March 1946

1946 March

August 1946

1946 August

“Dresses are beginning to get a bit sexier – most now are above the knee with short sleeves and a few even have spaghetti straps.

“In order to keep their hair in tip-top shape; women are encouraged to wash it every two weeks and to massage their scalps daily to increase circulation and prevent dandruff. The beauty pages also recommend that they take halibut oil capsules to prevent skin damage.

November 1946

1946 November

December 1946

1946 December

1947Janadj

January 1947

“Life” seems finally to be getting back to normal after the war – Cecil Beaton writes a piece on the changes that the country has experienced and expresses what still needs to be done in order for the world to recover fully.

“A little wool dress is a must-have item for the season since it’s versatile for both day and evening affairs. Cinched waists are popular these days and readers are recommended to wear belts to show off their figure.

“Vogue’s House & Garden book is set to re-launch next month. The publication of House & Garden was interrupted by the war but now is set to come out quarterly.” http://www.vogue.co.uk/magazine/archive/issue/1947/January/Page/1

1947March1 1947 March

June 1947

1947 June

November 1947

1947 November

December 1947

1947 December

“An issue that celebrates the Royal Wedding: HRH Princess Elizabeth with Lt. Philip Mountbatten RN: “For the Royal couple Vogue chooses a shoe – as a symbol of good luck – in this case HRH Princess Elizabeth’s own wedding shoe. We hope that their lives will be as smooth as its satin – their spirit as bright as its buckle – and their happiness as perfect as its shape.””Bridal dress in the great tradition: ivory satin with Botticelli-like delicacy and richness, with pearl and crystal roses, wheat, orange bloss

om. Flowing dress of apricot brocade and gold lame with bands drawn up to shoulders and falling into draped one-sided cape. Worn with the ribbon of the garter.”

“Meanwhile Sir Laurence Olivier, as director of the Old Vic, Joyce Grenfell and Hermione Gingold are all featured.

http://www.vogue.co.uk/magazine/archive/issue/1947/December/Page/1

March 1948

1948 March

“The dramatic New Look that had appeared in Paris the previous season is demonstrated in the silhouette of this issue’s cover model.”

April 1948

1948 April

“Cotton is the most important fabric of the season for dresses, while Dior pencil skirts and jackets are the two must-have items from the Paris Collections. Balenciaga is credited with bringing back high waist, or empire waistlines and other designers are beginning to follow suite.

“Meanwhlie critic Geoffrey Grigson writes a feature on the Tate Gallery’s memorial exhibition of British artist, Paul Nash and the Elizabeth Arden Salon celebrates the introduction of four new products – a foundation, two eye shadows and a hand crème.

http://www.vogue.co.uk/magazine/archive/issue/1948/April

1948AvrilFrance 1948 Avril [April Vogue France]

September 1948

1948 September

January 1949

1949 January

March 1949

1949 March

August 1949

1949 August

“Vogue’s circulation, we’re told in this issue, stands at 100,000: “That round figure, with its satisfactory number of noughts, is one that gives us great pleasure to announce.” Meanwhile, big summer trends: “Prominent pockets have been appearing ever since the Paris collections” and “Small hats or large hats. Very small, very large, no half-measures.”

“On dressing for pregnancy: “It is mainly a matter of planning your maternity clothes with the same enthusiasm with which you plan for holidays. No need to think in terms of clothes with nine month’s depressing influence and after that no future.” And the Vogue spotlight this month is on Braque: “I never know how a painting of mine will be when it is finished. It is no good starting with a definite image in my mind. If I only painted exactly what I saw in my mind’s eye, I might as well copy Rembrandt.”

http://www.vogue.co.uk/magazine/archive/issue/1949/August

1949 November

“Her Majesty the Queen and her daughter H.R.H. Princess Margaret are photographed in colour by Cecil Beaton, both wearing magnificent gowns by Norman Hartnell. Vivien Leigh, meanwhile, appears with a blonde hair do for her role as Blanche in Laurence Olivier’s London production of A Streetcar Named Desire.

“The life of the modern hostess is explored: “In this day and age, the hostess quite often doubles with the cook. And often from choice, for once having experienced the compensations of the staffless home, and the ease with which last-minute guests can be invited, she is unwilling to relinquish the freedom of the kitchen.”

http://www.vogue.co.uk/magazine/archive/issue/1949/November

November 1949

1949 November UK 1950January 1950

June 1950

1950 April 1 [June in UK]

“Black and white – more brilliant than colour; symbolic of a black andwhite season. Wide, round, level hat by Lilly Dache. Silk organdiecoat-dress: Larry Aldrich. Scarf by Kimball (all of New York).” http://www.vogue.co.uk/magazine/archive/issue/1950/June

January

1950JulyAug

1950 July August [France]

September 1950

1950 September UK

October 1950

1950 UK

“Jewel colours for an evening pump – topaz velvet, with gold kidlining. By Rayne. Stud earrings: Burma Gem Co. Lipstick and nailvarnish: Revlon’s “Brave.”

http://www.vogue.co.uk/magazine/archive/issue/1950/October

December 1950

December 1950 UK

1951Feb15 1951 February 15 1951March11951 March 1 [April UK]

“Blue-eyes look for spring: china blue velvet beret designed by Mr.John of New York. Interpreted by R. M. Hats for Marshall andSnelgrove, London and Country shops. Max Factor’s Blue Eye Shadow (theatrical) and “Pink Secret” lipstick.”  http://www.vogue.co.uk/magazine/archive/issue/1951/April

Vogue Cover - March 1951 Stretched Canvas Print

1951 March 1951May1adj 1951 May 1

July 1951

1951 July

“Mexican rebozo worn in the style of an Arab’s burnouse. Protectionagainst a withering foreign sun or our home-bred sea breezes.Lipstick: Gay Morning by Cyclax.”

http://www.vogue.co.uk/magazine/archive/issue/1951/July

August 1951

1951 August

September 1951

1951 August 1 US | 1951 September UK

September 1951

1951nov1951 November 1952April1adj 1952 April 1

April 1952

1952 April UK

1952Nov11952 November 1

1953SEPTEMBER-1953-570adj

1953 September

March 1954

1954 March UK

“The colour we raised the curtain on last month – orange… for a tinyhat shaped like a Viking ship, with a prow over the forehead. Injersey, detailed with russia braid, by Simone Mirman. The brooch,enlarging on our Oranges and Lemons theme – stones of two colours of topaz, in a horseshoe setting. One of the Dior designs now made inthis country for the first time, by Mitchel Maer. Available at Fortnum& Mason at the end of March. The lipstick is Revlon’s Baby Tangerine.”

http://www.vogue.co.uk/magazine/archive/issue/1954/March

Vogue Cover - July 1954 Stretched Canvas Print

1954 July

August 1954

1954 August UK

“Beauty, with emphasis on mouth and eyes to complement blue sapphire – Vogue’s colour choice for autumn. Make-up by Yardley: Pink Heatherlipstick; blue eye-shadow; Blonde Feather foundation.” http://www.vogue.co.uk/magazine/archive/issue/1954/August

1955 September 15

October 1954

October 1954 UK

“Spinach green – new autumn shade (see our colour booklet given away with this issue). Left: Spinach and grey tweed for a suit by FrederickStarke. Burnt orange hat by Otto Lucas. Lipstick: Vermeil by Lancome. Right: Spinach faille for a dress by C. D. Models. Sky-blue hat byOtto Lucas. Lipstick: Pompadour by Payot. The clothes and hats are at Fortnum & Mason and stores on page 268. Jewellery at Paris House.”

November 1954

November 1954 UK

“Cherries in the snow… cherry lipstick, cherry accents, a jacket ofnylon and fabric like untrodden snow. Lipstick: Cherries in the Snow, by Revlon. Hood and scarf in one, at Herbert Johnson. Jacket, thepurest-ever luxury, bound and buttoned in white kid, by Berg ofMayfair, 26 gns. from the shops given on page 150.”

http://www.vogue.co.uk/magazine/archive/issue/1954/November

1954Decadj

December 1954

“Much red together is a piece of news in fashion. Here, Dior’s pleated, two-piece dancing dress (very short), beneath a taffeta coat, and wornwith garnet-red bead earrings, bracelets, and necklace, shaped likeberries. Red fashion on the lips: Max Factor’s See Red.”

http://www.vogue.co.uk/magazine/archive/issue/1954/December

1955Janadj

January 1955

Paris talking point that’s also a colour point: all reds, as varied as you please, from the glowing red of the velvet beret to the biting red fleece coat, Make-up by Max Factor: See Red Lipstick; Sheer Geniusliquid foundation and Rachelle face powder.” http://www.vogue.co.uk/magazine/archive/issue/1955/January/View/Cover

1955Sep15adj 1955 September

December 1955

December 1955

Cover: A Child’s Dream of Christmas: a photographic study by Norman Parkinson.”

“The new Eastern feeling in Paris fashion is putting emphasis on a traditional design that makes Oriental magic of the newest casuals,” we’re told, as paisley makes a plays for the fashion’s front line.”

April 1956

1956 April

“Colourful send-ff to our international fashion theme – a shirt incotton satin by Emilio Pucci, made is geometrical segments of green, turqoise, coral. It’s straight and narrow, hip-length, with a diagonal neckline: 7 1/2 guineas at Woollands. Italian gilt earrings, 6 gns.,and wide bracelet, 12 gns., from Harrods. Lipstick: Yardley RoseCoral.”

http://www.vogue.co.uk/magazine/archive/issue/1955/December

1956 – Dina Moiry by Irving Penn

1956March15adj

1956 March 15

November 1956

November 1956

“Starting our rich album of India – the white marble city of Mysore.This picture was taken on the dais of a past Maharajah’s statue,looking towards the Palace entrances. The dress in white Witchcraft lace is by Julian Rose, 27 gns., at Woollands; Nola, Chester; Elaine,Guildford; and shops on page 210. White nylon parasol, price £6 at Liberty’s. White calf court shoes, price 10 gns. at Rayne. Whitecotton gloves, by Pinkham, 15s. 11d. from Peter Jones.”

December 1956

December 1956

January 1957

January 1957

“Heralding the beauty of 1957: hair smooth and up-swept, the glitterand glow of diamonds and pearls, the feminine formality of whitekidskin gloves and above all the translucence of this season’s complexion, achieved with Danamask fabulous powder and cream all-in-one. The colour is “Aurore”, the invisible accessory Danu’s Taby perfume.”

August 1957

August 1957

Shown above, a bumper-to-bumper portrait of the handsome car – it’s aRover 105 S, which is to say a superbly comfortable and beautifully finished machine, with automatic overdrive fitted for effortless speed (and it’s light on petrol, too). The price, with purchase tax, is£1,595 17s. The car in Normon Parkinson’s cover photograph wasspecially sprayed for us in fuchsia by Dunham & Haines of Luton(they’ll gladly undertake any special colour-spraying); though it’snot a colour-scheme in the regular range, we reckon it dashinglygood-looking. Suit and hat, John Cavanagh for Berg of Mayfair. Theblue-toned lipstick is Lancome Neo-Satin Fuchsia.

1957Sept15 1957 September 15

October 1957

October 1957

A topsy-turvy view of What to Wear with What – but no muddled thinking. The basis is a black and white tweed dress by Dorville. All accessories except jewellery are at Marshall & Snellgrove, Birmingham, Leeds, Leicester. The right-way-up girls wears a black mink beret by Otto Lucas; black doeskin gloves by Trefousse, 3 gns.; black patent bag by Jane Shilton, £14 5s. at Dickins & Jones; Kutchinsky’s diamond crescent earrings; a coral chiffon scarf and pink geraniums. Dior No. 31 lipstick. For the upside-down girl, Moriot’s marmalade velvet hat, 15 gns. at Marshall & Snellgrove; butter-yellow gloves by Dents, 59 s. 6d.; Cartier’s gold earclips; gold and topaz bracelets; gold, topaz and diamond brooch. Guerlain Giroflee lipstick.”

1957Oct15 1957 October 15 Vogue Cover - March 1958 Premium Giclee Print1958 March

April 1958

“The Season’s various events all demand a hat. Chosen with them in mind if this very feminine Easter egg of a cloche, beribboned with olive green velvet which knots just above the nape. By Simone Mirman. The ring, a huge Persian-esque, turqoise set in gold, by Boucheron. Thecigar-shaped gold compact is French, lattice-patterned, from Michael Gossechalk. Sea Green eyeshadow, Tulipe lipstick, by Guerlain”

September 1958

September 1958

Vogue Cover - December 1958 Premium Giclee Print 1958 December

February 1959

1959 February

July 1959

July 1959

“Scene from our Bahamas safari – showing the swagger of a beautifully authentic linen Bush jacket. Also making a brief but notable appearance, a jaunty pair of very short shorts. Tropical setting: LoveBeach – almost three-quarters of a mile of dazzling pink-white beach,flanked by brilliant turquoise and violet sea, coconut-laded palm trees- which is situated on the North West side of the island. Shirt byDonald Davies; matching shorts, Londonus. 8gns. the set at Maryon,Knightsbridge; Bournemouth. Lipstick: Coral Red by Harriet HubbardAyer.”

February 1960

February 1960

March 1960

March 1960

September 15, 1960 – Isabella Albonica

1960OctEarly 1960 Early October

December 1960

December 1960

January 1961

January 1961 UK

February 1961

February 1961 UK

A blaze of mango – the season’s most vibrant hue – that starts atopwith a straw cloche; moves on to a pale-toned mango frieze tweed coat,a leather pochette, lips and nails in Gala’s Paprika (in the shopssoon). Coat, 9 1/2 gns., all Wallis Shops. Hat, Edna Wallace, £3.9s.6d.; bag, Jane Chilton, 5 1/2 gns., both at Fenwick.

1961Feb1-Vogue-Cover-Dorothea-McGowan

1961 February 1 – Dorothy McGowan

1961Feb 1961 February 1961mar1vogue1mar1961adj

March 1, 1961 – Isabella Albonica by Irving Penn

March 1961

March 1961 UK

July 1961

July 1961 UK

Vogue - July 1961 Premium Photographic Print1961 July

September 1, 1961 – Dorothy McGowan

1961SeptFrance 1961 September [France]

September 1961

September 1961 UK

The new look of the eye emphasized by subtle shading but not lined. No longer is the eye’s colour sharply contrasted by vivid shadow and line, instead it is given a natural, alluring accent by matching make-up – here brown for brown; for blue eyes try a bluey grey shadow.For lips: a rounded softness, pretty pinks or reds, but never too paleor dark. Here, Max factor Golden Honey lipstick, and Hi-fi eye liner and mascara.

1961octukadj

October 1961 UK

“Lots of luxury, lots of beauty – Emba Autumn Haze mutation for a mink coat with slight pouching at theback, an inset waistband. At S. London. All jewellery at Kutchinsky.Lips: Elizabeth Arden’s Ananda Pink. This is just one of a beautiful collection in the fashion show of Ema minks to be staged at theGoldsmiths’ Hall by Vogue during an evening reception in aid of the Cof E Children’s Society, on the eve of the opening of theInternational Exhibition of Modern Jewellery, 1890-1961 (October 26-December 2). This exhibition will include about 800 of the most exquisite jewellery designs in the world

November 1961

November 1961 UK

Life-giving force for a wardrobe now: one of the furred hoods that rocked Paris a few months ago. This, in Emba Tourmaline mutation mink, over a jersey cap; Otto Lucas, at Fortnum & Mason. Gloves by Milore, Dickins & Jones. Jewellery by Michael Gosschalk. Lips: Eve’s Apple, by Peggy Sage. More red: the new MG Midget, £669 15s. 10d., with tax

March 1962

March 1, 1962 – Dorothy McGowan

March 1962

1962marchadj

March 15, 1962

1962_Marchadj

March 1962

Taking a quick cue from Paris – black teamed with white, a thought that ran right through the Collections. The leading part here: a deep straw cloche widely, brimmed and noticeably banded and bowed. By Otto Lucas, at Fortnum & Mason. The lipstick: Revlon’s Louis XIV Red. Photograph by Claude Virgin

The new collections are in and Vogue enjoys the geometry of coats that Paris offers, as well as the bright colours on tailored suits, evening dresses and sculpted hats.

Italy’s fashion report is illustrated and shows the cascade of ruffles on evening dresses to perfection

http://www.vogue.co.uk/magazine/archive/issue/1962/March%202/Page/1

http://www.vogue.co.uk/magazine/archive/issue/1962/March%202

1962apriladj

April 1962

Head-on start to spring; a great crescent brim of green chiffon over straw. From Simone Mirman. Black jet chokers by Corocraft at Harrods. Ring at Liberty. Lips and nails, Coral Touch by Peggy Sage. Photograph by Claude Virgin

Vogue discovers London designers’ penchant for European flair. A charming boat-neck Nina Ricci suit topped with a large wide-brimmed hat is the epitome of Sixties chic.

May 1, 1962 – Isabella Albonico

May 1962

May 1962

Cover-up story for summer, two-piece swimsuit reveals less than a modest one-piece (but won’t disguise a good figure). Major half is made in black Helanca, like a high-necked and sleeveleWhat makes a summer wardrobe tick, Vogue asks? It’s small details like a wide belt, baby Bretons and ruffles.ss jersey, bloused into a tight hip-band. Under it goes brief matching pants. By Donald Danvers, 10 gns. Breezy capaline of shocking pink and cherry red straw, by Dolores Glamour, £4 19s. 11d. White silk scarf, doodles in black, £3 10s. All from Liberty. Lipstick: Lentheric’s Pink Whisper. Photograph by Carapetian

In anticipation of the looming holidays, Vogue edits its favourite “playclothes”; attention-seeking looks perfect for the Mediterranean, including knee-skimming sundresses adorned with waist-cinching wide belts. Silk head-wraps add an air of mystery, while printed billowing maxi dresses act as a stylish cooler.

June 1962

June 1962

Featuring Jean Shrimpton on the cover for the first time, this issue promises us”the prettiest season ever”. “What’s an English summer?” asks the editor. “Well among other things it’s hot, still days and grasshoppers and the smell of suntanned skin, the ping of tennis balls and warm, crushed grass, the sweet prickle of strawberries, the gaudy stripe of awning and cricket club blazers, and the honky-tonk of summer fairs and What the Butler Saw on Brighton Pier…”

The time of year for Ascot, Henley, Eton’s Fourth of June and Glyndebourne” means clothes are as important to the season as stripes to a tiger“, and while many of the silk suits, slim skirts and free falling jackets are in black and brilliant colours, Vogue give an “Evening forecast: White windfall”. Snowy evening dresses are recommended because they “stand out in a roomful of colours like a dove in a parrot’s cage”.

August 1 1962 – Tilly Tizzani by Irving Penn

1962augus-vogue-wilhelmina-cooper-august-15th1962-gene-laurents

August 15, 1962 – Brigitte Bauer

November 1962

November 1962

Gladys Perrint’s cover illustration for this month’s Vogue captures this season’s new shapes perfectly.

March 1, 1964 – Anne de Zougher by Irving Penn

1963April1adj 1963 April 1 US

1963mayukadj

April 1 US | May 1963 UK

The new Dior Look – huge, round hat tilted to the back of the head, and filled with air like a giant pod. In this instance, it’s a big flat beret with a stalk and in a shiny biscuit Baku straw. Christian Dior Chapeaux, 21 1/2 gns., at Harrods. Lipstick: Dior’s no 29. Photograph by William Klien

1963MayAudrey Hepburn on the May 1963 cover of Vogue Paris

May 1963 Paris

September 1, 1963 – Jean Shrimpton

1963Septadj

September  1963 – Brigitte Bauer by David Bailey

 October  1963 – Brigitte Bauer

November 1963

November 1963

The allure made world-famous by Garbo; the shadowed, well-boned face under a beguilingly severe brim. Coming over strong beneath this brown and white calf-skin hat by Otto Lucas at Fortnum & Mason. The lipstick, Elizabeth Arden’s Saratoga Red. Photograph by Duffy

November 1963 – Jean Shrimpton  by Irving Penn

1964JanItaliaVintage Vogue Italia January 1964adj

Vogue Italia January 1964

1964Feb1 1964 February 1 Wilhemina

1964Marvogueadj

March 1964 – Sandra Paul

July 1964

April 1964 UK

The emblem of Paris this spring – the camellia. In a single touch on a cuff, ahead in a hat or pinned to the hair, on a pocket or now of a belt at the waist, at the neck to centre a soft collar or cravat, where you will, the camellia projects the new charm and prettiness Paris has given fashion. On the cover, it adds its own softness to an “eye-dipper” of shiny green leaves; from spring collection of Phillipe Venet. Camellias, gardenias and carnations are at Harrods from 3 s. a bloom. Lipstick: Revlon’s Morocco Coco. Photograph by David Bailey

Vogue finds her rhythm with the ‘On the Move’ shoot, featuring flowing silks and swinging pleats, and Jenepher Wolff travels to Egypt for this month’s travel feature.

http://www.vogue.co.uk/magazine/archive/issue/1964/April%232

 May 1964 – Wilhemina by Irving Penn

September 1964

September 1964

Alexandre of Paris, working ahead of but towards the Paris Collections, created this grand occasion hairstyle for Vogue: a chignon high on the crown, broad medieval-flavoured band of plaited hair, tulle under the chin. Make-up, Harriet Hubbard Ayer. Photograph, Henry Clarke

1964Nov15 1964 November 15 1964Nov1 1964 November 1

1965MarchWilhemina

March  1965 Wilhemina

1965March1irving-penn-vogue-cover-wilhelmina-1965-insta-final

1965AprilWilhemina

April  1965 Wilhemina

April  15, 1965 Wilhemina

Sophia-Loren-turbante

July 1965

July 1965

In 1963, Diana Vreeland became Editor in Chief of Vogue.  This shoot reflects Vreeland’s interest in exotic subject matter and travel, which she discovered via travel.  

EITORBeatrix Miller

“Sophia Loren photographed by David Bailey during the shooting of her newest film, Lady L, at Castle Howard, York. Here, as Lady L dressed as a Turkish dancer for the masked ball scene when her aristocratic husband (David Niven) appears as Macbeth, her anarchist liver (Paul Newman) as Casanova. Adapted from Roman Gary’s novel by Peter Ustinov, who also directs and plays the part of a Bavarian prince.

September 1965

September 1965

1965OctCatherine Deneuve on the October 1965 cover of Vogue Paris

October 1965 Paris

December 1965 – Wilhemina by Irving Penn

December 1965

December 1965 UK

The art of fashion entertaining, demonstrated by Elsa Martinelli. A long hooded organza coat, floating in ostrich feathers, pink and white. Long, white crepe dress, studded with crystals. By Pierre Cardin. Crepe by Abraham; organza by Guillemen; crystal embroidery, Mesrine; ostrich trimming by Albert. Hair by Carita

David Bailey photographs a crowd of entertainers including Shirley MacLaine, Catherine Deneuve, Julie Christie and Elsa Martinelli: “Some of them are original, some are beautiful, some of them are comic and others, for no apparent reason, are idolised by millions. All of them possess the mysterious power of attracting people who do not know them personally.”

Marianne Faithful is also featured just after the release of her latest single, Yesterday, and just before the birth of her son, while Sophia Loren appears dressed as a Turkish dancer for the masked ball scene in Lady L with Peter Ustinov, David Niven and Paul Newman.

March 1966

March 1966

Eye in the International Collections – this issue, news from Paris, Italy, London, Spain and New York. Make-up by Lancôme. dress, Chloe. Earrings, Mimi di N., 7gns., at Dickens & Jones. Photograph by David Bailey

Peggy Moffitt and Donyale Luna in Silk Prints by Dior. Photographer David Bailey

Donyale Luna becomes the first cover model of ethnic origin for Vogue, for an issue entitled Eye on the International Collections. The big fashion statements in the shoots sum up the style mood of the day: huge eyelashes, candy coloured tunic dresses (Jean Patou), long chiffon dresses by Cardin, plastic diamond dresses by Pierre Cardin and thick crochet tights.

May 1966

May 1966

September 1966

September 1966

December 1966

December 1966

March 1967

March 1967

1967July

July 1967 – Twiggy by Richard Avedos

October 1967

October 1967

April 1968

April 1968

September 1968

September 1968

1968DecLaurenButtonIrvingPenn

December 1968 – Lauren Hutton by Irving Penn

1970AugustKarenGraham

August 15, 1970 Karen Graham

1970OctCharlotte Rampling on the August 1970 cover Vogue Paris

August 1970 Paris

1970Dec

1971 December – Sophia Lauren by Richard Avedon

1971DecemberPrincessGrace

1971 Princess Grace by Richard Avedon

1971DecemberItalia

1971 December  – Vogue Italia

 1971 October – Donna Mills by Richard Avedon

1971Octphoto

April 1972 – Cher by Richard Avedon

Cher for Vogue, April 1972 by Richard Avedon.

April 15, 1972 – Sophia Loren

1972MayVogue US May 1972 Karen Graham 01

May 1972

December 1972 – Cher by Richard Avedon

1973FebruaryKarenGraham

February 1973 – Karen Graham

April 1973 – Lauren Hutton

May 1974

May 1974

October 1974

October 1974

March 1975

March 1975

Aurore Clement, French actress and Vogue’s Collections star, and the first in this issue’s world series great designers, Sonia Rykiel’s water-colour knits – nearly pink fine wool sweater with matching pull-on, and longer loose cardigan. Range if Sonia Rykiel clothes, at Browns. Make-up by Elizabeth Arden. Hair by Michael Michaeljohn. Make-up by Richard Sharah. Photograph by Toscani

April 1975

April 1975

May 1975

May 1975

diana-vreeland-theredlist1978JerryHall

Jerry Hall in 1978 with Diana Vreeland

In 1963, Diana Vreeland became Editor in Chief of Vogue

July 1975

July 1975

August 1975

August 1975

October 1975

October 1975

October 1975

October 1975

November 1975

November 1975

December 1975

December 1975

February 1976

February 1976

Marie Helvin is resplendent in Grace Coddington’s Tunisian fashion story, shot by David Bailey. The sea and sandy shores serve as the perfect backdrop for colourful maxi dresses and matching turbans.

 Model: Christina Ferrare

March 1976

March 1976

1976MarchMirrena

White and gold Moroccan look by Saint Laurent – bell sleeved long fine cotton dress, £55, metallic golden turban, £130, earrings, £21, necklaces, £35, £23, £75. All at Saint Laurent Rive Gauche. Make-up by Helena Rubenstein. Make-up, Barbara Daly. Photograph, Willie Christie

A packed international fashion issue featuring French ingénue Isabelle Adjani modelling Emanuel Ungaro and Catherine Deneuve lounging in Yves Saint Laurent.

British actress Helen Mirren is photographed by Lord Snowdon in a whirlwind of Krizia prints, while a 21-year-old Iman takes on the designs of Mary McFadden.

Yves Saint Laurent’s new collection is influenced by Morocco, so the Vogue fashion team were Marrakesh bound.

British actress Helen Mirren is photographed by Lord Snowdon in a whirlwind of Krizia prints, while a 21-year-old Iman takes on the designs of Mary McFadden.

April 1976

April 1976

April 1976

April 1976

May 1976

May 1976

Beachtime beauty – just add sunshine. Make-up by Revlon. Briefest poppy red towelling bikini, by Pascal, £10.90, at Elle shops. Line green cotton towel, from range at Harrods. Bangles, wire necklet, earrings, by Adrien Mann. Photograph taken in Morocco by David Bailey

For the cover and a beauty and fashion story, David Bailey shoots his favourite muse, Marie Helvin, in Morocco

September 1976

September 1976

David Bailey shoots his favourite model of the year, Marie Helvin, in Bill Gibbs’ eveningwear, inspired by the gilt of Indian saris

Marie Helvin – Vogue Italia April 1977 by David Bailey

 helvin 1975

November 1976

November 1976

December 1978

December 1978

September 1979

September 1979

October 1979

October 1979

Vogue goes to China for the October 1979 issue. Alex Chatelain shoots ‘Vogue In China’ – a fashionable tour around some of China’s most famous landmarks. ‘The Well Dressed Fur’ takes us through the best furs that money can buy. Plus the best buys for an instant winter wardrobe and Robin McDouall writes about ‘the Paddington Set’.

1979DecLauren Bacall on the DecemberJanuary 1979 cover of Vogue Paris

December/January 1979 Paris

January 1980

January 1980

April 1980

April 1980

June 1980

June 1980

July 1980

July 1980

August 1980

August 1980

February 1983

February 1983

1984April-1984_ADJ

April 1984

November 1984

November 1984

June 1986

June 1986

July 1986

July 1986

Inside, Maria Shriver is photographed marrying Arnold Swarzenegger: “Andy Warhol and Grace Jones, the latter in a skin of bottle-green Azzedine Alaia, made a thunderous late entrance to the church”.

October 1986

October 1986

January 1987

January 1987

February 1987

February 1987

April 1987

April 1987

1987MayKim Basinger on the May 1987 cover of Vogue Paris

May 1987 Paris

July 1987

July 1987

November 1987

November 1987

February 1988

February 1988

March 1989

March 1989

April 1989

April 1989

September 1989

September 1989

1989OctIsabelle Rossellini on the October 1989 cover of Vogue Paris

August 1989 Paris

May 1990 – Linda Evangelista by Irving Penn

  

1990AugFanny Ardant on the August 1990 cover of Vogue Paris

August 1990 Paris

1990OctIsabella Rossellini and her daughter Elettra on the October 1990 cover of Vogue Paris

October 1990 Paris

April 1991

April 1991

1991MayCatherine Deneuve on the May 1991 cover of Vogue Paris

May 1991 Paris

September 1991

September 1991

September 1992

September 1992

January 1993

January 1993

September 1993

September 1993

November 1993

November 1993

December 1993

December 1993

April 1994

April 1994

April 1995 Sharon Harlow by Irving Penn

July 1995 – Valerie by Irving Penn

August 1995 Paris

October 1995

October 1995

March 1996

March 1996

May 1996

May 1996

July 1996

July 1996

August 1996

August 1996

December 1996

December 1996

January 1997

January 1997

February 1997

February 1997

“No woman should be without a ruffle this summer,” says Plum Sykes, while Tom Ford, Clements Ribeiro, Alexander McQueen, Miuccia Prada, Valentino, Yohji Yamamoto and Karl Lagerfeld are cited as the seven designers who make up the season and Amanda Harlech is profiled as she moves from being “John Galliano’s right hand” to work with Karl Lagerfeld at Chanel.

May 1997

May 1997

June 1997

June 1997

July 1997

July 1997

August 1997

August 1997

Kylie Bax, Rhea Durham, Esther Canadas, Georgina Cooper, Karen Elson and Alek Wek are among the newest models on the scene, and David Bailey shoots a portfolio of British designers whose work is leading the way: Hussein Chalayan, Stella McCartney, Clements Ribeiro, Antonio Berardi, Anya Hindmarch, Joseph Azagury and Jean Muir.

September 1997

September 1997

Vogue pays tribute to Gianni Versace after his death two months earlier. In fashion, his influence is still very much at the forefront with modern power dressing that means “superbly structured clothes given a harder edge with flashes of leather, scalpel-sharp heels and whiplash eyes”. Meanwhile, mini skirts are back and Tom Ford and Alexander McQueen are “threatening to bring back the suit”

October 1997

October 1997

The image for this cover was taken in 1994 but used to mark the Princess’ death in a special tribute issue after her death two months previously. “Millions rarely heard her speak. Clothes were her vocabulary, a huge factor in her tremendous allure – and from faltering pidgin, she gradually became one of the most fluent fashion speakers of our time,” says Vogue, as Catherine Walker, Valentino, Amanda Wakeley, Caroline Charles, Mario Testino, Sam McKnight, Manolo Blahnik and John Galliano are among the high fashion figures who pay tribute to the Princess.

The issue also features Stephen Fry and Jude Law, photographed by Pascal Chevallier as they are about to be seen on screen as Oscar Wilde and Bosie in Wilde, Kate Weinberg wins the Vogue talent contest and Vogue salutes Gianni Versace, “the man who put the glamour in fashion”, after his shocking death in July the same year

November 1997

November 1997

December 1997

December 1997

Dolce & Gabbana are featured as the “designers of choice to the Hollywood set”, while Audrey Marnay, Karen Elson, Tanga, Kate Moss, Kirsty Hume, Stella Tennant (in Giorgio Armani on the cover), Jayne Windsor, Trish Goff, Georgina Cooper, Annie Morton, Shalom Harlow, Naomi Campbell, Cristina Kruse, Cordelia, Kiara, Georgina Grenville, Carolyn Murphy, Amber Valletta and Angela Lindvall are hailed as the “moment-defining models”.

January 1998

January 1998

As well as Naomi (wearing a white satin beaded dress, £250, with a pearl-grey silk tulle overdress with Swarovski beading, £1,370, both from Prada, on the cover), Kate Winslet is the star of this issue, photographed by Regan Cameron in the wake of her Titanic fame.

February 1998

February 1998

March 1998

March 1998

May 1998

May 1998

June 1998

June 1998

September 1998

September 1998

From left: Angela Lindvall, Bridget Hall and Carolyn Murphy all wear floral print dresses by Dolce & Gabbana on the cover.

October 1998

October 1998

November 1998

November 1998

Capes, formerly the “stalwart of nannies and nurses”, have come back into fashion, Elspeth Gibson’s first ever catwalk show is featured, as is the first Haute Couture show from Donatella Versace since the death of her brother, and Burberry is profiled just over a year after Rose Marie Bravo arrived to turn it around.

December 1998

December 1998

“Gorgeous, famous and married to a Hollywood star: If Nicole Kidman wasn’t so nice you’d hate her,” says Vogue. The issue also features the launch of the Crussh chain of lunch spots for a country in the midst of Hay Diet fever and Stella Tennant gives the lowdown on her home birth. Sophisticated looks take on a tribal vibe in Kim Knott’s Urbane Nomad shoot, while hippie luxe is given a whirl in the Earth Girls shoot by Tim Walker and opulence comes back in a deluge of diamonds and pearls.

January 1999

January 1999

February 1999

February 1999

London’s newest must-have, Earl Jeans, have arrived “to put danger back in demin”, says Vogue, as it explores what the Capital’s movers and shakers are wearing at night. “From chaotic coherence to serious chic, the dress code is split along tribal lines,” says Susie Forbes. Meanwhile Andrew Graham-Dixon discovers that Ingres is “one of fashion’s most influential image-makers”.

May 1999

May 1999

June 1999

June 1999

August 1999

August 1999

The issue carries with it a trend supplement highlighting: space age, Seventies, sleek silhouette, padding, wrapping, folk, sheepskin, fur, capes and ponchos, jackets, coats, green, gothic, white, knits, animal skins, black glamour, belts and scarves, boots and bags among the biggest trends.

September 1999

September 1999

Vogue profiles Wendy Deng: “Everyone was shocked when Rupert Murdock married [her], a Chinese go-getter less than half his age. But as his empire heads east, it makes sense for his heart to follow”. Meanwhile Julianne Moore is this issue’s Hollywood star and the ten key pieces for the season are: the gilet, the striped sweater, the ponyskin skirt, the funnel-neck coat, lean trousers, the embellished bag, the fitted jacket, high boots and the sheepskin jacket.

January 2000

January 2000

“If you’re sick of the boho vibe, take heart,” says Justine Picardie. “Now is the time to look sleek, modern and powerful.” An onslaught of sequins, rhinestones, and fluorescent Lyras, meanwhile, heralds the return of the disco era.

We’re also told to prepare for Sleepy Hollow, Tim Burton’s latest creation featuring Johnny Depp and Christina Ricci, Jonathan Rhys Meyers is “the most sought-after new beauty in Tinseltown” and Beth Orton is “the mixed-up modern folk singer” and “the perfect pop icon for the year 2000.”

February 2000

February 2000

March 2000

March 2000

April 2000

April 2000

May 2000

May 2000

June 2000

June 2000

“I didn’t realise I was going to be on the cover when I did the shoot,” says Ross. “A couple of months later I was on another shoot in Nepal and I got a fax congratulating me on making the cover. I was unbelievably excited – it was my first one.”

Vogue profiles Queen Rania of Jordan this month: “She has been compared to Jackie Kennedy and Princess Diana, but [she] is forging a role for herself as a modern monach”. Jarvis Cocker also makes it into this issue, as he prepares to launch his debut novel.

October 2000

October 2000

2004JanCatherine Deneuve on the DecemberJanuary 2004 cover of Vogue Paris

December 2004 Paris

2004 December Paris Catherine Deneuve

2005AugDemi Moore on the August 2005 cover of Vogue Paris

August 2005 Paris

2006March cover of Vogue Paris

March 2006 Paris

2007FebGaspard Ulliel on the February 2007 cover of Vogue Paris

February 2007 Paris

2010MayPenélope Cruz, Naomi Watts, Kate Winslet, Julianne Moore, Gwyneth Paltrow and Meryl Streep on the May 2010 cover of Vogue Paris

May 2010 Paris

Penélope Cruz, Naomi Watts, Kate Winslet, Julianne Moore, Gwyneth Paltrow and Meryl Streep on the May 2010 cover of Vogue Paris

2012MayLaetitia Casta on the May 2012 cover of Vogue Paris

May 2012 Paris

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About jackikellum

Jacki Kellum is a Fine Artist, a Designer, and also a writer. For one of her graduate programs, she wrote her thesis on William Blake. Like Blake, much of Kellum's work is about childhood and lost innocence. Also like Blake, Kellum strives to both write and illustrate her work. .
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